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Tomorrow's Value Research

Below are the results of the Tomorrow’s Value Rating carried out in 2011. Results of the latest Tomorrow's Value Rating 2013 are on the Two Tomorrows website


The Tomorrow’s Value Rating (2011) uncovered the extent to which the companies widely recognised as sustainability leaders deserved their place within the leading sustainability rankings. It also showed which companies were likely to deliver long-term investment value thanks to their sustainable practices.

RESULTS

The results of the Tomorrow’s Value Rating 2011 are presented as sustainability investment bands to reflect the premise that the potential to deliver long-term sustainability performance is an indicator of future share price*.

Aaa

Aa

Baa

Campbell’s

Allianz

Adidas

Danone

BMW

Arcelor Mittal

General Electric

Cisco

Banco Santander

Glaxosmithkline

Coca-Cola

BASF

HP

Ford

Colgate

Intel

Henkel

Deutsche Post

Nestlé

HSBC

E.ON

Nike

IBM

Gap

Panasonic

ING

H&M

Siemens

Nokia

Johnson & Johnson

Unilever

Procter & Gamble

Johnson Controls

 

SAP

Kesko

Toyota

Lloyds

UPS

McDonald’s

Vodafone

Microsoft

Volkswagen

PG&E

Westpac Banking Corp

Shell

 

Starbucks

Statoil

Swiss Re

Telefónica

 

Ba

B

Caa

Ca

C

Barclays

3M

Caterpillar

Credit Agricole Sa

American Express

Carrefour

Accenture

Encana

Honda

BNP Paribas

Chevron

AXA

Petrobras

Hyundai

CVS Caremark

Citigroup

China Mobile Communications

Samsung

NYK

Yum!

Deutsche Telekom

Sony

Total

 

Disney

Cummins

Target

Vestas Wind Systems

Enel

Heinz

 

 

ENI

Hitachi

JP Morgan

Verizon

Metro

 

Newmont

 

Pepsi

 

Philips

 

Rio Tinto

 

Roche

 

Symantec

 

Tesco

 

Walmart

 

Xerox

 

* Two Tomorrows does not recommend or endorse any specific investment and does not provide advice on investment options. Two Tomorrows is rendering professional opinion and assumes no liability whatsoever in connection with its use. It is the responsibility of the reader to evaluate the accuracy, completeness and usefulness of any opinions, advice or other information.

COMMENTARY

All the companies included in the Tomorrow’s Value Rating 2011 are doing good things. From community support to eco-efficiency, every company on this list has some outstanding examples of responsibility in action. But the companies in the investment grades (Aaa, Aa, Baa) are walking the talk. These are the companies describing management approaches that can deliver these amazing examples of responsibility now and into the future. We believe that the strongest companies of tomorrow will be those with the best sustainability practices today, and we expect great things from these companies.

KEY FINDINGS

As well as ranking 92 companies into bands, the Tomorrow’s Value Rating 2011 revealed several emerging trends in corporate sustainability.

Innovation is the cutting edge of sustainability
Game-changing innovation to integrate environmental and socio-economic benefits into the heart of business strategy is a must for any company wishing to become truly sustainable. Nike has demonstrated global leadership in innovation through its open-source approach to product design. It harnesses the power of a wide range of stakeholders to drive sustainable ideas into products.

Leaders consider the whole value chain
Sustainability leaders are widening their focus from their own operations to the entire value chain. They are placing pressure on suppliers to follow suit. Danone has shown leadership in developing a responsible value chain through direct engagement with suppliers.

The very best companies are embedding sustainability in core decision-making
While it is difficult to prove that a company is ethical, there are means to demonstrate to external observers that, when push comes to shove, sustainability issues will be considered alongside the financial implications of any business decision. What stakeholders want to know is that ethics will not be conveniently ignored when the opportunity for profit is present. Swiss Re exemplifies this approach. Its Sustainability Risk Framework formally identifies and addresses environmental, social and governance risks. When any of these risks are present, a mandatory process has to be followed before the company will proceed with a transaction.

Some companies are just repackaging business as usual, but the leaders address the sticky issues
There is a danger that companies are taking existing practices and passing them under the sustainability lens to give us a compelling green picture of the company. These practices may have positive environmental impacts, but are fundamentally profit driven. This can turn to green-wash when the sticky issues are ignored or given little consideration. Gap demonstrates that it is facing its challenges head on, for instance by addressing prominently on its website tough questions of real concern to stakeholders.

Paucity of targets is symptomatic of a lack of direction
Rapid change is a must for the sustainable company, but there are indications among the rated companies that this change is largely without direction. One of the most telling signs is the surprising lack of meaningful targets. This leaves stakeholders unable to judge whether a company has been successful with its sustainability commitments.

FULL REPORT

Download a 16-page Tomorrow's Value Rating 2011 report providing more detailed commentary and key findings. You just need to let us have your contact details:

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